Tag Archives: The Beach Boys

April 20 – The Beauty of Imperfection

Why are we drawn to music? It’s a perplexing question, and one we’ve addressed on a personal level on Great River Radio. Is it simply a matter of taste? Or is it a desire to hear or witness perfection? After all, the general public seems to be in awe of the artist who can deliver a “clean” performance. It’s how we judge our athletes, mathaletes, celebrities and even parenting skills. Flawless = success. But there is new evidence that suggests that although we may be impressed with perfection, our emotional connection to a song arrangement may have more to do with the imperfections – or the unexpected – than a perfect rendition of that song. Dr. Daniel J. Levitin has been studying this phenomenon at McGill University in Montreal with the assistance of many of Great River Radio’s favorite recording artists. And the findings are fascinating.

In an interview, the singer Rosanne Cash said the experiments showed that beautiful compositions and technically skilled performers could do only so much. Emotion in music depends on human shading and imperfections, “bending notes in a certain way,” Ms. Cash said, “holding a note a little longer.”

She said she learned from her father, Johnny Cash, “that your style is a function of your limitations, more so than a function of your skills.”

“You’ve heard plenty of great, great singers that leave you cold,” she said. “They can do gymnastics, amazing things. If you have limitations as a singer, maybe you’re forced to find nuance in a way you don’t have to if you have a four-octave range.”

Before you dismiss Levitin as just another academic trying to force all of his “bias and complicated science stuff” on a favorite subject we’d prefer to just experience without thinking about too it too much, you might be interested to know that he once worked as a producer and engineer for rock legends Stevie Wonder, Steely Dan, Blue Oyster Cult, the Grateful Dead and many others. Not impressed? Well, he’s also played sax with Sting (one of Dan’s favorite artists) and Mel Torme (one of Brian’s), and some guitar with David Byrne. In other words, he comes at this from a performer’s perspective as well as a scientist.

Levitin may just be discovering what many of our most successful artists have always intuitively known: it is the elements of unique character and unexpected notes and rhythms that we often connect with.

Geoff Emerick, a recording engineer for the Beatles, said: “Often when we were recording some of those Beatles rhythm tracks, there might be an error incorporated, and you would say, ‘That error sounds rather good,’ and we would actually elaborate on that.

“When everything is perfectly in time, the ear or mind tends to ignore it, much like a clock ticking in your bedroom — after a while you don’t hear it.”

Perhaps, this is a lesson for all of us? We tend to get caught up in the rhythm of life, humming along in a ceaseless succession of regular tasks, duties and activities. It is only when that beat becomes altered that we pay attention to the music around us.

Take a little time today to embrace the imperfections in our lives – the unexpected moments that give meaning to our day. And tune in to Great River Radio to discover some of those voices who continue to surprise us in unexpected ways.

You can read the full article Levitin’s research in The New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/19/science/19brain.html

In a new Great River Radio programming twist, Dan and Brian were engaged in a music-library showdown this week. Brian challenged Dan to come up with favorite five songs from 1966 (the year Brian was born). Dan accepted and volleyed his own challenge, asking Brian to come up with five songs inspired by works of art or artists. You’re going to love the music we’ve come up with for these setlists.

And as always, we have a plethora of great new music. You’ll hear from Haley Bonar’s new LP, “Golder.” We’ll check in again with Lucinda Williams and play new tunes from Marissa Nadler, The Mountain Goats, The Belle Brigade and The Raveonettes.

Join us live this afternoon from 4:15-5:45 (CST) for a great new session of Great River Radio.

Peace,

Brian & Dan

Details:
Great River Radio – Wednesdays 4:15-5:45 p.m.
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Playlist
Black River (Live)-Amos Lee
Where Not To Look For Freedom-The Belle Brigade
Running With The Wolves-Cloud Cult
Kid October-Haley Bonar
I’ll Tag Along-Richard Thompson
War In Heaven-The Raveonettes
Baby, I Will Leave You In The Morning-Marissa Nadler
Fade Into You-Mazzy Star
The Age Of Kings-The Mountain Goats
96 Tears-? and the Mysterians
19th Nervous Breakdown-The Rolling Stones
Eight Miles High-The Byrds
God Only Knows-The Beach Boys
Two Trains Running-Paul Butterfield Blues Band
The Art Teacher-Rufus Wainwright
Painted From Memory-Elvis Costello
In The Gallery-Dire Straits
Art School-The Jam
Painting By Chagall-The Weepies

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March 2 – Music and Movies

Dan had a dream last night (really, he woke up and called me!) – There we were on the red carpet, cameras flashing in front of our eyes, the people on the bleachers shouting “Great River Radio!” and then someone thrust a microphone in front of him and asked “WHO ARE you wearing?” and Dan, needing to tell the truth, replied “I got this from Dayton’s in 1986 – sorry about the missing button” and then he woke up.

The Great River Radio staff likes to stay in touch with culture – we’re not exactly culture hounds, but like all good English majors, we like to see movies and then talk about them.  Between songs during our show, we are often discussing something we’ve seen in the theater.  But sometimes we are faced with a choice:  music or movie?  We can’t do it all!

This afternoon, though, we are going to happily combine our interests and play music from the movies.  For the fourth year in a row, Great River Radio will get you ready for Oscar night (next Sunday) by reviewing our favorite songs from soundtracks – from the past year and earlier.  We’ve talked often of the inextricable relationship between what  we see on the screen and what we are listening to on the soundtrack – we’ll explore that relationship again today and ask, among other questions, why some songs are used repeatedly in soundtracks, and why some directors seem to be more gifted than others in “curating” songs for their movies.

Rather than letting you know what artists we are playing, we’ll pique your interest with movie titles.  You’ll hear music from one of our favorite movies of the year “The Fantastic Mr. Fox,” from the Tween favorite “The Twilight Saga: New Moon,”  and from the rugged ”Hurt Locker” and “The Road.”  “The 500 Days of Summer” had a wonderful soundtrack, as did “Where the Wild Things Are.”   From older films we’ll hear songs from “The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” and “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly.”  We’ll also be hearing songs which have been nominated for Oscars THIS year from “Crazy Heart,” “Paris 36” and “The Princess and the Frog.”

Join GRR for music and the movies today live today from 4-6 p.m. (CST) at  http://www.stthomas.edu/ustclubs/kust/KUSTLive.html

Brian/Dan

Playlist
Down In New Orleans-Dr. John
Julia’s Theme-Alexandra Desplat
All Is Love-Karen O and The Kids
Theme from The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind-Jon Brion
Unstatisfied-The Replacements
Please, Please, Please Let Me Get What I Want-She  & Him
Loin De Paname-Nora Arnezeder
The Road-Nick Cave/Warren Ellis
Orange Sky-Alexi Murdoch
All My Days-Alexi Murdoch
Heroes And Villains-Beach Boys
Let Her Dance-Bobby Fuller Four
Up In The Air-Kevin Renick
The Weary Kind-Ryan Bingham
Meet Me On The Equinox-Death Cab For Cutie
Bella’s Lullaby-Carter Burwell
The Journey Begins-Mark Isham
All The World Is Green-Tom Waits
The Way I Am-Marco Beltrami
I Can See In Color-Mary J. Blige
Playground Love-Air
Goodbye-Kevin Shields
Fools Rush In (Kevin Shields remix)-Bow Wow Wow
Pale Blue Eyes-Velvet Underground
Life On Mars-Seu Jorge

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